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Before March 17, decarbonized economy and leading the fight for responsible energy and environmental policy. Once more he uses humor and awkwardness to depict a situation that is all too familiar, with an original direction, a sharp screenplay, and hilarious performances. Les dysfonctions érectiles touchent 150 millions dhommes dans le monde et 3,5 millions en France (1).

Categories: Erectile Dysfunction | viagra coupons

Comments

  • RobotMachines

    RobotMachines

    March 10, 2015, 8:58 am

    I know this is going to get buried at the very end but this little voice will try again to point something out. He was "paying around 800 dollars per month for insurance taxes and copays." Without insurance, why would he not be able to pay for the pills himself. Does it cost more than $800 a month for a bunch of pills? It really seems to me that it's not just insurers that may be causing problems, it is probably over-charging. Maybe that's the entire problem, hospitals and doctors charging too much. Just a thought.

    Reply

  • nightshifter

    nightshifter

    March 10, 2015, 5:57 am

    I consider myself and every other decent human being 100 steps above condescending assholes like you. You like to stab at age because it's easier to classify people that disagree into a nice little group, possibly named "young punks" in that wee brain of yours. The rest is occupied by the huge chip on your shoulder, take a look at your posts, you happen to be proving my point for me.

    You have failed if your goal was to ever keep the peace, as your kind are now instigators of unrest among the populace. By kind I refer to the corrupt, power abusing, holier-than-thou, bullies that have been given badges. Your mission is to protect and serve, not intimidate into meek compliance. Just remember, in this day and age information gets around, one of the times you abuse your power is going to cost you.

    Oh and quit hiding behind "everyday operational policing", it's beginning to make you sound quite silly. Like a phonograph with a bent needle.

    Reply

  • wonderhat

    wonderhat

    March 10, 2015, 6:14 am

    Sorry, but what posts are you talking about? All the dying animal posts I've seen have been after emergency moments that would require a quick rush to the animal hospital, or empty of that need at all.

    I think all the posts like that that I remember have been about the moral decision to leave death as a natural part of life cycle or to cut the pain short and put the animal down, both of which are valid arguments that one can justly support.

    Stuff like you mentioned, yeah, that's fucked up, but I can't remember or find through searching any posts that matched your description.

    Reply

  • nixonrichard

    nixonrichard

    March 10, 2015, 12:45 pm

    >Are you suggesting that the broadly associated groups do not work together (with at least the help of the government) to reduce inefficiency and maximize the benefit to the individual bodies?

    I'm saying I REALLY don't see people on the right mixing up corporatism and capitalism, and it would be a massive stretch to say this is the case. Massive. The US isn't very corporatist at all, and I don't see very many people pushing for us to be more corporatist, with the exception of a few areas. For instance, right now there is a lot of talk about having the insurance industry and the health care industry work together to reduce inefficiency (all guided by the government). That's one specific example of a slightly corporatist policy, but it's still quite minor.

    In general, the US has instituted strict laws which prohibit things like price fixing, manufacturing collaboration, shared profit arrangements, and the like. Trusts and guilds are generally prohibited in the US except in certain circumstances.

    Reply

  • Tetraca

    Tetraca

    March 11, 2015, 6:30 am

    I am anticlerical. Theism itself is of no threat to anything in normal situations, and in some respects it may be beneficial for some individuals to persist themselves in delusion. But, the organization of these delusions results in great dangers to the advancement of our modern world in the form of anti-intellectualism, organized conversions, and plain and detrimental untruths spread across the land.

    So long as the pursuit of these things which some call truths is an enforced individual activity it is ensured that it will seldom interfere in our collective progress for actual truth.

    Reply

  • Daishiman

    Daishiman

    March 11, 2015, 4:53 am

    Honestly, I think it's a matter of a culture of consumerism where everything is expendable and shiny just to be thrown away two months later.

    I remember being there right at the beginning of the Furby and the Beanie-baby craze. Those were some ridiculous things that were in the worst possible taste.

    My second reaction to American aesthetics came from the preponderance of SUV and minivans. I'm not exactly crazy for cars, but those things, generally speaking, looked bloated and huge for no particular reason, and the trend has only gotten worse, especially in that horrendous culmination of ugliness called the Hummer.

    And let's not get started about clothing. The people who consider themselves to "not care" go beyond not trying to look good, using shit-colored jogging pants and oversized t-shirts. Meanwhile, the people who did supposedly care dress in overpriced Abercrombie shirts that expelled a special kind of douchebaggery built into the very brand, and I'm sure others have followed up since then.

    Let's talk about food: it's always about having the bigger dish. Gigantic, humongous, inhuman-sized dishes. A buttery baked potato and extra-cheese onion soup every now and then are great, but when I went on road trips it seemed like every single place had specialties that consisted of heart attack material. That's not to say that there isn't a culinary culture in the States, but it's certainly not something the common man cares about. It seems to me it's always about size over flavor even when there's no reason for that.

    As for people showing off, I've never seen people who liked to show off as much as the American middle class with their basements full of cheap mass-produced crap. It appears to me that in other countries I've been too people with similar purchasing power bought substantially less things, but of a much higher quality, at the very least with the intention to show that what have acquired shows refinement and class. IMO, I prefer people with with class rather than people who just have lots of anything.

    Reply

  • david76

    david76

    March 10, 2015, 7:12 pm

    There is this assumption by religious people that the Big Bang theory implies there was a point at which there was nothing. This is not the case. The Big Bang theory describes what is observed, that is that matter appears to have originated at a single point in space. The theory does not say there was nothing before the universe started expanding. I content there is no more a beginning to time as there is an end. So, the universe had no beginning, it just always was and always will be. What existed before the start of the universe's expansion is beyond the scope of the Big Bang theory.

    Reply

  • mourningdue

    mourningdue

    March 11, 2015, 5:15 am

    Anyone who says that there is a worse one that this is a damn lier. My memory is a bit sketchy on this, but I remember how pissed off I was at it when I was a kid:

    It was about some sort of rare coin that Bugs Meany had stole and Brown had been hired to get it back. He found Bugs and his buddies eating hot dogs at a diner. Brown took one look at Bugs and knew that he had stolen the coin. How?

    Because Bugs had put ketchup or onions or something on his hot-dog BEFORE putting mustard on, and as every hot-dog afficienado knows you always you always put it on AFTER the mustard. Did he seriously think that there would be even one kid reading that shit who was a "hot-dog afficienado"?

    Reply

  • Echospree

    Echospree

    March 11, 2015, 8:27 am

    #23

    >A Canadian army medic examines one of eight children brought to a forward operating base after they fell gravely ill from eating explosive powder at a home in the Panjwai district of Kandahar province September 12, 2009. Roadside bombs made from homemade explosives are the leading killers of foreign troops in Afghanistan. (REUTERS/Finbarr O'Reilly) #

    Odds are, whoever brought these kids into the FOB was, or is highly related to, the same person making these explosives for use against those who are trying to save these kid's lives.

    Wtf.

    Reply

  • Sumguy42

    Sumguy42

    March 11, 2015, 12:47 am

    I am jumping into this field. Next year, any home sold around here will have to have a home energy audit done when sold. The upside is the homeowner can qualify for lots of cash rebates for increasing the home's efficiency. Problem is they don't have many auditors now (it is optional to do the inspection now) My first year college is dealing with these audits and "The house as a system" Second year is renewable energies. This is all new here and I can see some more specialized training becoming available.

    Reply

  • beautify

    beautify

    March 10, 2015, 8:07 am

    Yea I used to play for a top guild, and we were all making gm tickets because, as usual there were major issues with a patch. I said something like, I'm gonna slit my wrists this is just so frustrating jokeingly toward the end of him trying to figure out our problem. there was a delay in response, I got a message from him "Are you serious, if you are serious we can have some one talk to you over the phone" I just responded with shock, and a 0o face. I mean, we had been joking for the last 30+ min with this gm about getting the instance working again. Then i remembered hearing about the policy.

    Reply

  • aidanpryde18

    aidanpryde18

    March 10, 2015, 4:43 pm

    I call Bullshit on you Maestro888.

    1) If you are bullet time fast enough to see a girl trip and throw her drink into your setup and close the lid before the liquid lands on your gear, then maybe that might help. For the rest of us in dark clubs, that isn't happening.

    2) Get off your high horse about the medium on which the music is stored. DJ'ing as a profession is all about playing the right track at the right time. Not about technical proficiency. Sure, at the highest level maybe we could argue, but for the average guy at a club/house party, people just want to have a good time and dance. They aren't paying attention to the transitions as long as they don't sound like shoes in a dryer. Only trainspotters like you give a shit.

    Computer technology has increased the boundaries of creativity for a DJ. Besides, anyone stupid enough to use the automix capabilities of most software will quickly have mistakes.

    If you can't keep up with innovation, stop trying to sound superior about your deficiencies.

    EDIT:

    I upvoted you, just so others can hopefully laugh at your ridiculousness.

    Reply

  • annjellicle

    annjellicle

    March 10, 2015, 10:04 am

    I do this every time. I even get a little weirded out at restaurants when I come across this in eggs cooked by someone else.

    Most people think I'm nuts for this. I have only met one other person that does this. It was an ex's aunt. She called it "de-noodling" the eggs. That's what I call it now.

    Do you use a fork to get it out? I find a fork and a paper towel (to wipe the slimy part on) to be the best way.

    I feel like a dork that I just typed all of that out, but that's ok. :-)

    Reply

  • Ic0n0clast

    Ic0n0clast

    March 10, 2015, 6:14 pm

    >The hierarchy rule in the context I provided still isn't answered. Isn't any form of democracy rule of the majority? If you agree that it is a voluntary arrangement (the democratic choices) then I'm not sure how you can object to voluntary employment being hierarchical.

    Well I'd like to answer this but I don't clearly understand what you are trying to ask. As such my answers will likely be insufficient, general and perhaps not even on point. So if you can try to elucidate for me what you mean precisely I might be able to answer more accurately. However I will attempt here to answer what I think you are asking.

    Democracy is a hierarchy at least in the sense of majoritarian systems, anarchism is opposed to such systems and so any rule of the majority is deemed outside of the anarchist ideological sphere. If what you are saying is that hierarchical employment as a societal standard is similar to democracy I would loosely agree, in the sense that it is an imposition of rule by one class over another. In some theoretical cases the ruling class might be a majority, though none that I know of, in such a case it would be a majority over minority system like democracy. Nonetheless all of those systems are outside of anarchism. I feel like I'm missing something in your question though.

    The problem with the segment of mises that you quoted is that it requires the assumption of property. Since property is a social construct it's assumption leaves us with a burden we needn't bear. Before we can discuss who is in the right to act upon the property we need to establish whether property itself is consented to. While it is for the owner that doesn't imply the consent of everyone else.

    I think that the reason that the initiation of force isn't agreed upon is because certain people wish to assume the existence of exclusionary property. Since we cannot be honest and assume the justification of such a construct, there must first be good cause given to its existence before we can side with the owner. And furthermore even were such a cause given, we could not assume the nature of property and what privileges and restrictions one has toward it. Until all such things are consented to by all parties, it would be inappropriate to side with the owner, as the owner is making an assumption of his rule without consent of the others.

    Reply

  • RisenMind

    RisenMind

    March 10, 2015, 12:29 pm

    To The Bosses In Charge of Hiring.

    I so sick of going into a interview and having the person in charge of hiring

    have a fake ass respectfulness talk about my would be job, then I get my chance to tell all my skills and I have a lot...in my field which is anything related to Art...I have done everything from a storefront sign to websites...and even compose music...but they somehow feel I am overqualified My resume to sharp, clean and classy...then say they are just looking for someone to do the "basic" cut and paste or what not....shake my hand and say they will take a few more applicants...and will let me know. "NEVER"

    Is it because you bosses do not like to hire anyone with more or better talent or skills...well fuck you all for your interviews I now know I am seriously more skilled oh and a lot younger.

    Reply

  • Fauropitotto

    Fauropitotto

    March 11, 2015, 3:03 am

    >I think ~10% of real estate agents are productive. So it's pretty clear that I think 90% of them could be removed and the economy would only benefit.

    What actual numbers do you have to back that statement up?

    > Real estate agents make money right now because most buyers and sellers are ignorant.

    So...Medical doctors make money right now because most patients and family members are ignorant. As wikipedia resources increase, the legitimacy of medical doctors will increase.

    Also, your ad hominem attack was just that. You did not use it in the argument, neither did I use it in mine. I did not bring logical fallacies into the discussion.

    Reply

  • ecko3r1

    ecko3r1

    March 10, 2015, 7:18 pm

    Hello,

    A few questions:

    * 1. Did you have and family or friends or anyone that you knew before you moved?

    * 2. Did you know the language or any parts of it? If not, did you attempt to learn before you went or did you just move there and figure it out from there?

    * 3. How old were you when you moved? What kind of educational background did you have?

    * 4. Did you have trouble finding a job or did you feel that your work experience from here in the US didn't really matter as much and that you had to "start over" in Norway?

    Thanks!!! I am very curious myself and very interested in moving as the US seems to be going down a path I want no part of.

    Reply

  • jooliver

    jooliver

    March 11, 2015, 6:05 am

    I can somewhat understand banning smoking in public places....after all second hand smoke does have health effects on others. But, so does things like alcohol or unsafe sex. How many innocent people are hurt by those that get behind the wheel after drinking or someone that knows they have an STD, but does not use a condom~

    I think that smokers are being unfairly targeted with not only bans, but taxes as well. As others here have said we are on a slippery slope to start banning and taxing everything that the gov deems unhealthy.

    Reply

  • goots

    goots

    March 11, 2015, 4:26 am

    Thanks, Patton.

    How about General MacArthur, one of Patton's peers. I think he's the one worth listening to:

    "The soldier above all others prays for peace, for it is the soldier who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war."

    "I have known war as few men now living know it. It's very destructiveness on both friend and foe has rendered it useless as a means of settling international disputes."

    My grandfather, a career enlisted man who met Patton and was promoted by him in Europe, said that he would follow MacArthur anywhere. He never said the same about Patton.

    Reply

  • DeShawnThordason

    DeShawnThordason

    March 11, 2015, 1:33 am

    Even a short hyphenated name is problematic. I've had one all my life, and I'd rather take either one over the both at once. For one example, let's say my last name was "Smith-Jones", some computer systems would have me as "Smithjones", others, as just "Smith" and on most standardized tests I would fill in "Smith Jones" as my last name (no bubble for the hyphen) and pray the system doesn't choose to truncate at the space.

    Besides, in the long run it doesn't matter if the child's name is "all yours" or "all his", since you will find that the child is going to end up rather all his or her own.

    Reply

  • Grizzly_Corey

    Grizzly_Corey

    March 10, 2015, 4:00 pm

    I know exactly what you're talking about. I take Rt. 2 every day. Easter weekend of this year coming back (remember when all the toll booth workers called in sick?) the line was particularly long coming into 95/128, there were about 15 cars whizzing by in the breakdown lane. Finally having enough I straddled the breakdown lane and right lane so no more of those assholes could cut the line. Coincidentally the worst I've ever had to piss in my life. I couldn't stand up straight when I got out of the car.

    Reply

  • SAugsburger

    SAugsburger

    March 10, 2015, 8:11 am

    I wasn't the first to downmod you, but I would dispute both.

    Ever since XP replaced the Windows 9X family NTFS has been the preferred FS on new Windows boxes (ie. for the last 8 years!). Newer versions of Windows don't even offer FAT32 as an option during install. I haven't seen a Windows box using FAT32 as the partitioning system for the HDD for some time. The only place that I see FAT32 much anymore is on external storage and that is only so that both Mac and Windows users can use the device out of the box without partitioning it. Until a few years ago flash drives were so small that they used FAT16! External HDDs are only FAT32 to allow Mac and Windows users to use the device out of the box.

    That being said external HDD vendors are soon going to hit into a dilemma because in a couple years we will hit the limits of FAT32. They will either have to adopt xFAT or NTFS, which will either force Apple to license a Microsoft FS or have Mac users reformat their devices once they get home. Considering that SDXC is supposed to use xFAT as the standard format I think Apple will end up at the very least licensing xFAT. Unless Mac OS *dramatically* grows in popularity I don't see MS licensing HFS+.

    As for the average Windows user still using CDs I would differ. A lot of younger users rarely listen to audio CDs on any device and a lot of newer software is released on DVDs.

    Reply

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